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Archive for April 2015

Disadvantage of Streaming Media in the Online Classroom

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Disadvantages of Streaming Media

Disadvantages of Streaming Media

Just as there are reason to use streaming media in an online class, there are reasons to limits its use. Following are a few of the things one needs to consider before loading their course with tons of media.

  • Bandwidth and Storage – Streaming media require sufficient bandwidth to play, especially at higher quality. It takes up a lot of space. Lack of proper bandwidth can result in slow playback, possible start/stop of video if connection is not good, and poor quality of video. In developing the media the instructor needs to be mindful of this and use it when pedagogically sound reasons exist.
  • Online Only – Student can only watch the video when they are online. If the user’s Internet connection is cut during playback or they need to watch your content offline, they will be out of luck. As an instructor, make sure you provide the link to the students well in advance so they will have plenty of time to view the materials prior to any due dates.
  • Cost – Media can be costly to produce. Depending on the projects it can include expensive camera equipment and high-end computers, as well as technical expertise. Check with the technical staff concerning the amount of assistance you can expect and the equipment available to you before starting any major project.
  • Creation – Producing good video content isn’t always easy. You will need to write scripts, properly light your subject, record and edit it, all before you can Stream Media. There are some simple techniques that you can use, which we will discuss later, but for now know that creation can be costly and time consuming. It is better to start off with a small manageable project than to shoot for a Hollywood style media project that never gets produced.
  • Copyright Issues – An alternative to creation of your own video is to use media that someone else has already produced. If you choose to not create your own media project then you must make sure you have settled any copyright issues with the creator of the video. Streaming copyright protected materials can land you and the education institution in legal battles.
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Written by Dr. Sherri E. Ritter

April 27, 2015 at 9:00 am

Advantages of Streaming Media in the Online Classroom

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Advantages of Streaming Media

Advantages of Streaming Media

There are several advantages to providing streaming media to an online class. The following is a list of reasons, but it is not comprehensive.

  • Instant Playback – Media files are large. If a media file is loaded into a standard Learning Manage System (LMS) such as Blackboard, the student would have to download the entire file before viewing, which can take considerable time depending on the bandwidth provided by their Internet Service Provider (ISP). Streaming media allows the student to start viewing quickly and jump forward and backward in the video.
  • Piracy Protection – Although nothing is completely secure, Streaming Media technology is harder to copy. The technology does not stored the media file on the viewer’s computer and once the media is played, it is discarded by the media player. This provides the content creator more control over intellectual property.
  • Education – Streaming media can be used to augment educational opportunities, particularly in online education. It helps to engage students at both the auditory and visual level, which improves retention of material.
  • Anytime Anywhere – Students can access the media anytime and anywhere. Students can take as much time as needed to study and review the materials. After viewing the material they can take time to formulate question and analysis the materials before engaging others in discussing the media.
  • Equal Access – Video has been used for many years in the traditional classroom for a variety of pedagogical reasons. Distance learning classes should have equal access to visual material. Streaming media gives the instructor that opportunity without wasting a lot of valuable time downloading the media.

Written by Dr. Sherri E. Ritter

April 20, 2015 at 9:00 am

Streaming Media in the Online Classroom

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Streaming Media

Streaming Media

Streaming media is video/audio content sent in compressed form over the Internet. With streaming media, one does not have to wait until the file is completely downloaded to play because it is sent in a continuous stream. This continuous stream allows it to be played as it arrives. Users can pause, rewind or fast-forward, the media just as they can with a downloaded file. The exception being with live streams.

In this series live streams will not be discussed, instead recorded media will be the focus. Recorded media has the advantage of being editable, whereas live streams takes place in real time. Live streams are not modified as they are streamed to the audience, therefore mistakes are included.

With recorded media the instructor has the ability to pull out all the little golden nuggets of wisdom and rearrange the media to flow in a fluid manner. This allows the instructor to maintain control of the content and the order in which the student receives the materials. This is not the only advantage to using media in the online classroom, but I will discuss this in greater detail later in the series. This series will cover the following topics:

  • Advantages of Streaming Media in the Classroom
  • Disadvantages of Streaming Media in the Classroom
  • Pedagogy for Streaming Media in the Classroom
  • Types of Media and Instructor can create for the classroom
  • Getting Started Creating Streaming Media
  • Tools for Creation of Streaming Media
  • ADA Compliance of Streaming Media

Written by Dr. Sherri E. Ritter

April 13, 2015 at 9:00 am

Blackboard Tip # 52: Task

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The Tasks tool is a great asset when working on large course projects. You can use the tasks tool to organize projects/activities by defining task priority and tracking its status. As an instructor you can keep student’s on-track by prioritizing activities and monitoring their progress. The Task tool can also be use by the student to organize and prioritize their activities in a single course or in all their courses.

There are two types of Task, Course task and Personal task. A Course task is created by the instructor and can be used to monitor the students’ progress. Personal task are created by students and cannot be viewed by anyone except the creator.

Course Task

From the Student Menu click Tools> Task> Create Course Task

Create a Course Task

Create a Course Task

 

Faculty View of Task List

 

Faculty View of Task Lisk

Faculty View of Task List

 

Student View of Task List

Student View of Task

Student View of Task List

 

Faculty View of Task Status

Faculty can see a list of course task with a summary of students’ progress.

Task Status Summary

Task Status Summary

 

By clicking on the Number associated with the Task a detailed summary will open with a list of student names and statuses.

Task Status Detail

Task Status Detail View

 

Personal task

Personal task are created by students and cannot be viewed by anyone except the creator. The process of creating a task is the same except the task must be accessed outside an individual course. To create a Personal task you must log in to Blackboard. On the BridgeValley Online tab under the Tools Module select Tasks> Create Personal Task.

Written by Dr. Sherri E. Ritter

April 6, 2015 at 9:00 am

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